Specialty Procedures

We offer a variety of Specialty Procedures such as Myelography and Arthrography; they are important diagnostic procedures that are generally ordered by a Neurosurgeon or Orthopedic surgeon prior to surgery or sometimes even post-surgical.
Our facilities are fully equipped with fluoroscopy suites, and monitoring equipment for the purpose of providing our patients the practicality of receiving their procedures conveniently, efficiently and safely.

Myelography (Myelogram)

Myelography is an imaging examination that involves the introduction of a spinal needle into the spinal canal and the injection of contrast material in the space around the spinal cord and nerve roots (the subarachnoid space) using a real-time form of x-ray called fluoroscopy.

  • You should inform the physician of any medications you are taking and if you have any allergies, especially to barium or iodinated contrast materials.
  • Women should always inform their physician and x-ray technologist if there is any possibility that they are pregnant. Many imaging tests are not performed during pregnancy so as not to expose the fetus to radiation.
  • The physician will need to know if (1) you are taking medications that need to be stopped a few days before the procedure, these include certain antipsychotic medications, antidepressants, blood thinners (anticoagulants), and some other drugs and (2) whether you have a history of reaction to the contrast material used for the myelogram.
  • You may be asked to remove some or all of your clothes and to wear a gown during the exam. You may also be asked to remove jewelry, removable dental appliances, eye glasses and any metal objects or clothing that might interfere with the x-ray images.
  • At the conclusion of the myelogram, the patient usually remains in an observation area for up to two hours and is discharged. You should plan to have a relative or friend drive you home after your procedure.
Arthrography (Arthrogram)

Arthrogram is medical imaging to evaluate conditions of joints. There are several methods to do this. Conventional arthrography is the x-ray examination of a joint that uses a special form of x-ray called fluoroscopy and an injection of contrast material containing iodine directly into the joint. Alternate methods of arthrography examinations use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT).

  • No special preparation is necessary before arthrography.
  • You should inform the physician of any medications you are taking and if you have any kidney problems or allergies, especially to iodinated or gadolinium-based contrast materials. Also, inform the doctor about recent illnesses or other medical conditions.
  • Some MRI examinations may require the patient to receive an injection of contrast into the bloodstream. The radiologist or technologist may ask if you have asthma, or allergies of any kind, such as allergy to iodine or x-ray contrast material, drugs, food, or environmental agents. However, the contrast material used for an MRI exam, called gadolinium, does not contain iodine and is less likely to cause side effects or an allergic reaction.
  • You should tell the technologist if you have any metal implants, medical or electronic devices in your body, because they may interfere with the exam or potentially pose a risk, depending on their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet.
  • Women should always inform their physician and x-ray technologist if there is any possibility that they are pregnant. Many imaging tests are not performed during pregnancy so as not to expose the fetus to radiation.
  • You may be asked to remove some or all of your clothes and to wear a gown during the exam. You may also be asked to remove jewelry, removable dental appliances, eye glasses and any metal objects or clothing that might interfere with the MRI or CT images.
  • You should plan to have a relative or friend drive you home after your procedure.

After the procedure is completed, the computer generates visual images of the area of the body that was scanned. These images can be transferred to film (hard copy) or burned to a CD. A radiologist is a physician who is specially trained to interpret images of the body. The interpretation is transmitted in the form of a report to the physician who requested the procedure. Your physician can then discuss the results with the patient and/or family.